Wednesday, March 16, 2016

A Natural Fix for A.D.H.D.

Environment vs. drugs.   What to do with a restless mind?

I recently read an article from the New York Times that suggests that originally we were meant to be a bit distracted and that distractedness has helped  us evolve by being better hunters and gatherers.   Apparently there is a gene that is correlated with people with better nutrition that is also a marker for ADHD.

Maybe sometimes all that is needed is a change to a more stimulating environment.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/02/opinion/sunday/a-natural-fix-for-adhd.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&_r=0

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Message from Google concerning everyone who is following my blog

Google has announced the "retirement of Google Friend Connect for all non-Blogger sites. We made an exception for Blogger to give readers an easy way to follow blogs using a variety of accounts. Yet over time, we’ve seen that most people sign into Friend Connect with a Google Account. So, in an effort to streamline, in the next few weeks we’ll be making some changes that will eventually require readers to have a Google Account to sign into Friend Connect and follow blogs.


As part of this plan, starting the week of January 11, we’ll remove the ability for people with Twitter, Yahoo, Orkut or other OpenId providers to sign in to Google Friend Connect and follow blogs. At the same time, we’ll remove non-Google Account profiles so you may see a decrease in your blog follower count.


We encourage you to tell affected readers (perhaps via a blog post), that if they use a non-Google Account to follow your blog, they need to sign up for a Google Account, and re-follow your blog. With a Google Account, they’ll get blogs added to their Reading List, making it easier for them to see the latest posts and activity of the blogs they follow."


Copyright © 2010-2016 Traveller Journey Through The Cortex

Friday, December 11, 2015

Back to blogging. -- Up the nose

well, I did get my turbinates reduced.  Nice quick outpatient procedure.  For those of you not knowing the nose, the turbinates are two spongy bones that stick into the nasal passages.  The turbinates, also known as nasal concha, help,warm and humidify air going up the nose.  They can get enlarged due to allergies.   When they are enlarged, you can't breathe and can't smell.

The doctor doesn't go and scrape the top layer of the turbinates.   The top layer is very important to the sense of smell and the humidification of the nose.   Rather, he scrapes underneath the surface.

Net, result of the turbinate reduction is that I can smell a lot better and I can breathe.   Breathing is really important when you have sleep apnea and use a clap machine.

I waited several months to see where my sense of smell was going.  It did get a bit better but it still isn't there yet.  Went to another ENT and got a script for theophylline and beta carotene.  I am supposed to start nose training with some scents.  Will let you know how this turns out.

Copyright © 2010-2015 Traveller Journey Through The Cortex

Friday, August 28, 2015

quick update


Gentle Readers,Will go back to blogging soon.  Husband started dialysis, and had both renal cancer and thyroid cancer so I've been more than a little bit busy.  Will go back to posting soon.
Copyright © 2010-2015 Traveller Journey Through The Cortex

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Round 2 on the Nose

I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and have been noticing that I am sleeping with my mouth open.  This had lead to problems adjusting to the cpap machine.  I tried the full face mask to compensate for mouth breathing but it was way too onerous so I fell back on the nasal mask with pillows.  Even with the nasal mask, it took some doing to adjust to it, but now I can tolerate it.

However, the nasal mask has not stopped the mouth breathing.  So, I am not getting the full benefit of the cpap machine.  I feel like I am breathing through a straw.  Additionally, our home humidifier isn't working so my nose is very dry.   Also, I am sensitive to dust in the house so I start getting a runny nose and sneezing.

Mouth breathing also impacts dental issues.  The tongue may not support the upper arch of the mouth.  Also,  mouth breathing can  eventually lead to getting your teeth out of line. Poorly aligned teeth can lead to all kinds of jaw problems.   Finally, mouth breathing changes the PH in your mouth and saliva leading to gingivitis and tooth decay.  I have had a problem continually with periodontal issues all my life and end up going to dentist four times a year for teeth cleaning.  The pockets between my teeth and the gum can be so large that I risk losing a tooth if I don't keep up with cleaning.

Additionally, my gentle reader will remember that I don't have much of a sense of smell.  Opening up my nasal passages has helped somewhat.  Taking a lidocaine mixture as a presurgical prep really did help my sense of smell a lot as it opened up the nasal passages.  However, it was only a temporary effect.

Given all these issues relating to the nose, I went to see an ENT doctor who put me back on a 6 pack of prednisone, nasal washes and Budesonide.  Same routine as my pre surgery routine with Dr P. did with my previous nasal surgery with the same marginal results.  So we have decided to do some turbinate surgery as I have enlarged turbinates.  The turbinates are the long curved bone shelf that produces into the nasal passage.  When the turbinates get too large especially from sinusitis or allergies, it is necessary to shrink them.   Thus, the prednisone and nasal washes.  When these treatments don't work, it is necessary to have turbinate reduction surgery.  I have that scheduled for Friday.

So, at the end of the day, I am hoping to get my nose passages opened up so I can breathe better, sleep better, stop mouth, improve my dental hygiene, and hopefully get my sense of smell back.

Copyright © 2010-2015 Traveller Journey Through The Cortex

PRESUMED SINUS-RELATED STRABISMUS

Interesting hypothesis about sinusitis related strabismus.   Even though these are just case studies and not a double blind test, Dr. Ludwig is pointing out some interesting observations linking sinusitis and strabismus.   The concept is in its infancy but is intriguing.

I have wondered myself about sinusitis and strabismus.  I had sinus surgery previously (complete ethmoidectomy and deviated septum, basically cleared out all my sinuses ) and had my sense of smell tested ( congenital anosmia, born with decreased sense of smell).  I have always thought that not getting much oxygen in the body would affect a lot of my physical problems, especially  my neurological problems  including the eyes. And I have seen a small improvement in vision with depth depth perception as my sinus problems have gotten better.

Think about it.  Oxygen is key to many metabolic processes.

I have also wondered about having any problems with my facial structure.  I have a long face and I wonder if my orbital bones are out of whack.

dr. Ludwig is hypothesizing that there is a link between strabismus and sinusitis.  Treating sinusitis can avoid eye surgery in some cases. Sinusitis creates infections that weaken eye nerves and muscles. Opthamological complications of sinusitis are well known in the literature: cellulitis, orbital abscesses, etc.  Many strabismuses due to sinusitis have been attributed to cranial nerve involvement, ie palsy.  Vertical diplopia linked with chronic sinusitis has been due to orbital floor collapse.

All this is just a hypothesis but still intriguing.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1280096/

Saturday, January 3, 2015

US researchers identify gene network linked to autism

U.S. scientists have identified a molecular network of genes known to contribute to autism spectrum disorders, and they say their finding may help uncover new genes linked to these conditions.

According to the news release, researchers used gene expression data and genome sequencing to study the whole set of interactions within a cell, and they identified a module comprised of 119 proteins linked to autism genes.
Researchers also found that the corpus callosum and oligodendrocyte cells in the brain can contribute to autism.  Oligodendrocytes are myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system, and the corpus callosum is a huge band of myelinated fibers. Myelin, which is comprised of proteins and phospholipids, forms a sheath around nerve fibers and increases the speed at which impulses are conducted.
"In the future, we need to study how the interplay between different types of brain cells or different regions of the brain contribute to this disease,” study author Jingjing Li, postdoctoral fellow at the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, said in the news release.
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/12/30/us-researchers-identify-gene-network-linked-to-autism/